Tag Archive for 'Quotes'

Whitespace

Some might argue that passive whitespace is the unconsidered space present within a composition. I disagree: if you don’t consider all your whitespace, that’s just bad design. Passive whitespace creates breathing room and balance. It’s important.

Mark Boulton

Design flourishes under constraints

[On the concept of design in general, regardless of what medium it’s in] Design really flourishes under constraints. The more known quantities that we have to deal with, the more creative solutions we can often apply. After all, design is all about creating order out of chaos.

Ethan Marcotte

HTML5 Priority of Constituencies

In case of conflict, consider users over authors over implementors over specifiers over theoretical purity. In other words costs or difficulties to the user should be given more weight than costs to authors; which in turn should be given more weight than costs to implementors; which should be given more weight than costs to authors of the spec itself, which should be given more weight than those proposing changes for theoretical reasons alone. Of course, it is preferred to make things better for multiple constituencies at once.

W3C

(Translated: “It’s all about the user baby!”)

The history of CSS resets

http://sixrevisions.com/css/the-history-of-css-resets/

Sound foundation ensures sane development.

Nate Koechley

Reading and scanning on the web are not the same thing

Users read left-to-right. Users scan top-to-bottom. This is why it makes sense to left-justify menu labels (list items) and headings.

Jakob Nielsen

Web app personality is essential

Software is media today, particularly consumer software. When people use it [your software] they approach it in the same way they would approach media. When I say media I’m talking about a magazine, or a newspaper, or a TV show.

When you think about The New York Times vs. The Wall Street Journal, Vanity Fair vs. Vogue, or Fox News vs. CNN: each of these media properties have a voice; they have an attitude; they have a style, and it’s unique, and it’s different.

Lazy by nature

You won’t hear me say that ignorance is bliss. But as a non-intellectual person, when creating things I need to find a sound balance between knowing and not knowing. I found out long ago that this is the best way for me to explore my creative capabilities, and make the design process worthwhile. My experience is that if you’re interested, the effort it takes to figure things out is reduced drastically. And that’s really a blessing for someone like me who is otherwise lazy by nature.

Jos Buivenga

Appropriation

… borrowing of a style, typically used elsewhere, as the basis for a design. This may be done for purely aesthetic reasons as a method to present information in a certain way, but often it is done to borrow characteristics that are associated with the appropriate source. Establishing such a connection may add credibility to the design or cause it to be viewed in a certain way.

Gavin Ambrose & Paul Harris

Ultimate soda-lover’s destination

My thought had always been; that what I wanted to do was do business with other businesses my size, to help them become new businesses.

John Nese, Owner Galco’s Soda Pop Store

The fold: 5% of users’ total time is spent past the 2,000-pixel mark

Even though 5% of users’ total time is spent past the 2,000-pixel mark, they tend to scan information that far from the top fairly superficially: some pages are very long (often 4,000+ pixels in my sample), and thus this 5% of user attention is spread very thinly. In our study, user viewing time was distributed as follows:

  • Above the fold: 80.3%
  • Below the fold: 19.7%

We used an eye tracker with a resolution of 1,024 × 768 pixels. These days, many users have somewhat bigger screens, and we’ve conducted many (non-ET) usability studies with larger resolutions. Although using a bigger monitor wouldn’t change my conclusions, it would somewhat increase the percentage of user attention spent above the fold simply because more info would be available in the initially viewable space.